EXITING GANGS: EXAMINING PROCESSES AND BEST PRACTICE WITHIN AN ALBERTA CONTEXT

Leslie MacRae-Krisa

Abstract


Gangs and gang-related crime have been an increasing concern in Alberta in recent decades. Gang exit strategies have been identified in the Alberta Gang Reduction Strategy (Government of Alberta, 2010) as a key activity in reducing gang-related violent crime and violence in the province. The purpose of this article is to explore available academic and gray literature on gang exit to support the development of gang exit interventions in the province. Findings from the review point to the diversity and complexity of gang involvement and membership, and the consequent need for multi-dimensional approaches to gang exit. Exit programs must address the root causes of membership, and identify and address barriers to pro-social activities. The complexity of gang membership also requires a strategic approach to programming that includes single case management, intensive training, and targeted outreach, as well as multiple systems involvement. Importantly, as Alberta moves forward with its Gang Reduction Strategy, systematic, comprehensive research studies on the “gang problem” in Alberta and its associated impact on the community are vital for the development of effective intervention strategies.

Keywords


gangs, Alberta, gang exit, gang exit processes, gang exit strategies

Full Text:

PDF




International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies
ISSN
(online) 1920-7298
© University of Victoria

 

This journal is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported license.