EXPLORING INFLUENCES ON MENTAL HEALTH AFTER INTERPERSONAL VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

Cathy Carter-Snell, Sonya L. Jakubec

Abstract


Women who have experienced intimate partner violence or sexual assault are well known to have extremely high rates of mental illness such as post-traumatic stress disorder and depression, as well as high rates of chronic illness, re-victimization, and suicide. The purpose of this in-depth analysis of the literature was to determine the relative impact of selected risk and resilience factors and the quality of existing evidence. The analysis of risk and resiliency pertaining to mental health impacts was guided by a social-ecological model, examining individual, relationship, community, and societal influences. An improved understanding of these factors and the quality of evidence underlying them can inform future research and interventions aimed at preventing or reducing the mental health impact of these crimes, and point to a direction for more inclusive examinations of the literature.

Keywords


interpersonal violence, mental health, women, social-ecological model, critical literature review

Full Text:

PDF




International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies
ISSN
(online) 1920-7298
© University of Victoria

 

This journal is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported license.