CANADIAN EARLY ADOLESCENTS’ SELF-DISCLOSURE TO SIBLINGS AND BEST FRIENDS

Brynheld Martinez, Nina Howe

Abstract


This study addressed children's reports of self-disclosures to their siblings and best friends in early adolescence. Twenty-four boys and 22 girls in Grade 4 (M age = 9.48, SD = .59) and 19 boys and 28 girls in Grade 6 (M age = 11.15 years, SD = .55) were interviewed regarding disclosures to siblings and friends. They also completed the Sibling Relationship Questionaire (Furman & Buhrmester, 1985b) and the Friendship Activity Questionaire (Bukowski, Hoza, & Boivin, 1994) to rate the quality of each relationship. Participants were more likely to disclose peer, academic, and shared interest issues to friends than siblings. Boys reported discussing shared interests more frequently with both siblings and friends. Respondents who disclosed to their siblings also reported higher warmth, rivalry, and greater conflict in their sibling relationship. Early adolescents who did not disclose to their friends reported greater friendship conflict. Findingds are discussed in light of recent theory and empirical literature.

Keywords


self-disclosure, friendships, sibling relationships, relationship quality

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International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies
ISSN
(online) 1920-7298
© University of Victoria

 

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