TRAJECTORIES OF PARENTAL MONITORING KNOWLEDGE AND THEIR ASSOCIATIONS WITH ADOLESCENTS’ SUBSTANCE USE, POOR ACADEMIC OUTCOMES, AND BEHAVIOUR PROBLEMS

Leanne Findlay, Rochelle Garner, Dafna Kohen

Abstract


Lower levels of perceived parental monitoring knowledge have been associated with various risk behaviours among children and youth. Data from the Canadian National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth were used to: 1) identify longitudinal patterns of parental monitoring knowledge through early adolescence; 2) explore associations between these patterns and socio-demographic factors; and 3) examine the association between patterns of parental monitoring knowledge and behavioural and academic outcomes. Results revealed that a 3-group model best represented patterns of parental monitoring knowledge. Socio-demographic factors were found to differentiate membership in these patterns. Findings also suggested that lower levels of perceived parental monitoring knowledge were associated with higher levels of behaviour problems, poorer academic outcomes, and a greater likelihood of substance use.


Keywords


Parental monitoring knowledge, adolescence, behaviour, academic outcomes, trajectories

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International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies

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© University of Victoria
Victoria, BC Canada

 

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