DOES IT MATTER WHERE I LIVE? COMPARING THE IMPACT OF HOUSING QUALITY ON CHILD DEVELOPMENT IN SLUM AND NON-SLUM AREAS IN GHANA

Farouk Rabiu Braimah, Elaine T Lawson

Abstract


Deteriorating physical characteristics and limited access to social services are said to typify a substantial number of the housing types in Ghana. The impact of these on vulnerable groups such as children remains largely unresearched. This paper comparesthe quality of houses in a slum (Old Fadama) and a non-slum (Asylum Down) community and its impacts on child development. Data was collected from 150 children between the ages of 9 and 17 years with the aid of semi-structured interviews. The findings showed housing quality was directly linked to income levels. Hence children in non-slum communities lived in better quality houses, had better access to sanitation services, and had better access to education and recreational facilities. The results served as the basis for a theoretical discussion and recommendations for improving child development through the provision of better quality houses, access to improved sanitation, and facilities for recreation.


Keywords


children, education, Ghana, housing, non-slum, quality, sanitation, slum

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International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies

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