THE CRACOW INSTRUMENT FOR MULTI-PROBLEM VIOLENT YOUTH: EXAMINING THE POSTDICTIVE VALIDITY WITH A SAMPLE OF PRESCHOOLERS

Patrick Lussier, Raymond Corrado, Jay Healey, Stacy Tzoumakis, Nadine Deslauriers-Varin

Abstract


The Cracow is an assessment tool used to identify the risk/need factors in youth at various developmental stages, with the goal of developing individual, familial, and community interventions for violent youth. The Cracow is comprised of three sections measuring the risk/needs of the youth, treatment and intervention options, and externalizing behaviours. The current postdictive validity study of the first section of the Cracow examines the extent to which risk/need factors identify the most physically aggressive preschoolers. The study is based on the first 100 children (boys, n = 58; girls, n = 42) recruited as part of the Vancouver Longitudinal Study on the Psychosocial Development of Children conducted in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. A series of latent class analyses (LCA) suggests the presence of three groups of physically aggressive children: a low-, medium-, and high-level group. Subsequent analyses suggest that children in the highly physically aggressive profile were more likely to have risk/need factors in the following five domains: (a) pre/perinatal, (b) socio-economic, (c) family environment, (d) child psychological functioning, and (e) parenting. Findings are discussed in light of the scientific literature on the early prevention of antisocial and aggressive behaviour.


Keywords


aggression, assessment, early childhood, parenting, pre/perinatal, prevention, risk factors, violence

Full Text:

PDF




International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies

Published by
© University of Victoria
Victoria, BC Canada

 

This journal is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported license.