IMMEDIATE RESPONSE: ADDRESSING ANTI-NATIVE AND ANTI-BLACK RACISM IN CHILD WELFARE

Gordon Pon, Kevin Gosine, Doret Phillips

Abstract


Anti-oppression emerged in the 1990s as a perspective for challenging inequalities and accommodating diversity within the field of social work, including child welfare in Canada. Using the concepts of white supremacy, anti-Black, and anti-Native racism in conjunction with the notion of the exalted national subject (Thobani, 2007), we contend that any understanding of the overrepresentation of Aboriginal and Black children in the care of child welfare services must be located within the wider narrative of white supremacy that has underpinned the formation of the post-war welfare state. This overrepresentation highlights the need to shift from anti-oppression to critical race feminism and anti-colonialism perspectives in order to address more effectively anti-Black and anti-Native racism and the economy of child welfare.


Keywords


child welfare, critical race feminism, anti-colonialism, anti-oppression, anti-racism, disproportionality

Full Text:

PDF




International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies
ISSN
(online) 1920-7298
© University of Victoria

 

This journal is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 Unported license.