Queer Science, Queer Archaeology: Moving Beyond the Feminist Critique

Leah Getchell

Abstract


Feminism still remains a ‘dirty’ word in some academic disciplines today, particularly in the hard sciences. It is argued however that a feminist critique of Western scientific thought has shed much light on the omissions of the androcentric discipline. Feminist theory has influenced how archaeologistshave both theorized about and practiced archaeology over the last two decades. What this article argues however is that the feminist epistemological standpoint, while important, situates itself in an extremist standpoint as the scientific objectivists do. In order to find an even more holistic and appropriateway to explore and think about our human past, a queer science and archaeology should be undertaken. Not only does queer theory provide a more holistic way to critique lived experiences today and in the past, it moves beyond the feminist focus and provides a more compelling evaluation ofhistorical and modern institutions of power and knowledge production.



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