BAD JOBS, BAD PARENTS? HOW JOB CHARACTERISTICS RELATE TO TIME WITH CHILDREN AND SELF-EVALUATIONS OF PARENTS

Sabrina L. Speights, Samuel J. Grubbs, Beth A. Rubin

Abstract


Using a data set of employed parents in the United States, the 2008 National Study of the Changing Workforce, this paper examines work characteristics, the amount of time parents spend with their children, and how parents evaluate themselves in their parenting role (their “self-evaluations as parents”). The results indicate that although work hours correlate with time spent with children, they do not correlate with parents’ self-evaluations. Autonomy is critical to both parenting outcomes, even after controlling for time spent with children. Family structure is also correlated with time spent with children, but not with self-evaluations. These findings indicate that for working parents, some of the characteristics of their work influence both the amount of time spent with children and the degree to which they feel they are good parents.

Authors’ note: A previous version of this paper was presented at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the Southern Sociological Society in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Keywords


work–family, parenting, time with children, parenting evaluations

Full Text:

PDF


DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18357/ijcyfs81201716740



Copyright (c) 2017 Sabrina L. Speights, Samuel J. Grubbs, and Beth A. Rubin

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies

Published by
© University of Victoria
Victoria, BC Canada

 

This journal is published under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 Unported license.