RECONSIDERING RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN JAPANESE RESIDENTIAL CARE AND THE ROAD TO FICE JAPAN

Shigeyuki Mori, Satoru Nishizawa, Arimi Kimura

Abstract


In order to foster interactive discussions with other countries, this paper offers an overview of residential care for children in Japan and its ongoing development. Japan still relies especially heavily on the residential care system; this is due to the past process of development more than to traditional Japanese culture. The period from the post World War II era to the present is briefly described, including the rapid growth in the number of institutions before 1960, the rather stable period before 1990, the revision of the Child Welfare Act in 1997 permitting the privatization of institutions, and the movement towards problematizing child abuse in the mid 1990s, after which residential institutions were designated as the last resort for maltreated young people. In the present situation, smaller institutions and a foster care system are strongly promoted in accordance with international guidelines for alternative care and the recent governmental guideline based on the Child Rearing Vision of 2010 and the Child Welfare Act of 2016. The task of present Japanese residential care institutions is to realize a family-like environment and a better placement strategy, collaborate more with specialists to improve the standard of care, function in the community as centers for the care of children in need, and expand their care work for young adults and care leavers. The paper concludes by stressing the need for more international exchange among individuals and groups working in Japanese residential care.

Keywords


residential care, Japan, history, reformation process

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DOI: https://doi.org/10.18357/ijcyfs91201818123



Copyright (c) 2018 Shigeyuki Mori, Satoru Nishizawa, Arimi Kimura

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International Journal of Child, Youth & Family Studies

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