THE ROLE OF CITIES IN ENDING VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN IN SOUTH AFRICA

  • Rongedzayi Fambasayi North-West University
  • Rejoice Shamiso Katsidzira University of Pretoria
Keywords: cities, SDG 11, violence against children, SDG 16.2, pathfinding cities

Abstract

The global development agenda acknowledges the role of cities in achieving the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and addressing contemporary challenges caused by urbanization. SDG 11 aspires to make “cities inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable” by 2030, even as the global urban population continues to grow exponentially, along with — even more rapidly — the population of children living in cities. Cities are the level of government closest to people’s daily lives, and are best placed to address the numerous challenges and rights violations that children are exposed to, including sexual exploitation and abuse, violence, trafficking, and child labour. SDG 16.2 has the primary aim of ending the “abuse, exploitation, trafficking and all forms of violence against children”. Through the lens of the subsidiarity principle, this article argues that localization to the city level of law and policy strategies that address violence against children can provide normative and powerful legal tools for their protection. Although there is developing scholarly literature on the global aspirations expressed in SDG 11 and SDG 16.2, little has been offered from a child rights perspective on the role of city governments in the prevention of, and protection of children from, violence.

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Author Biographies

Rongedzayi Fambasayi, North-West University

Doctoral researcher, South African Research Chair in Cities, Law and Environmental Sustainability, Faculty of Law

Rejoice Shamiso Katsidzira, University of Pretoria

Doctoral candidate, Centre for Human Rights, Faculty of Law

Published
2022-09-15
How to Cite
Fambasayi, R., & Katsidzira, R. S. (2022). THE ROLE OF CITIES IN ENDING VIOLENCE AGAINST CHILDREN IN SOUTH AFRICA. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 13(2-3), 52-71. https://doi.org/10.18357/ijcyfs132-3202221032