Community Belonging and Sedentary Behaviour Among Métis Canadians: A Gendered Analysis

Scott Anderson, Jennifer L. Copeland, Cheryl L. Currie

Abstract


Study Purpose: Framed by intersectionality theory, this study examined how gender and sense of community belonging interact to influence sedentary behaviour during leisure among Métis adults in Canada. Methods: Data were obtained from 1,169 Métis adults who completed the Canadian Community Health Survey in 2012. Weighted linear regression models examined associations between sedentary behaviour and community belonging stratified by gender, adjusting for confounders. Results: Male gender, younger age, physical activity, and increased socioeconomic status were associated with less sedentary behaviour among Métis adults. Métis men with a very strong sense of community belonging spent 3.6 fewer hours per week engaged in sedentary pursuits during leisure than Métis men who reported a very weak sense of community belonging. Conversely, Métis women with a very strong sense of community belonging spent 1 additional hour per week engaged in sedentary pursuits during leisure than Métis women who reported a very weak sense of community belonging. These associations remained significant after adjustment for sociodemographic covariates and perceived mental health and overall health, suggesting other factors were influencing these differences. Conclusions: A strong sense of community belonging among Métis men may reduce sedentary behaviour during leisure by as much as 30 minutes per day, which may be clinically significant. Increased community belonging among Métis women was associated with increased sedentary behaviour. These findings suggest that interactions between community belonging and gender should be considered when developing interventions to reduce leisure sedentary behaviour among Métis adults in Canada.


Keywords


Métis; sedentary behaviour; community belonging; gender; social determinants of health; socio-ecological; intersectionality theory

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18357/ijih122201717781

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Copyright (c) 2017 Scott Anderson, Jennifer L. Copeland, Cheryl L. Currie

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

This work is licensed under Creative Commons BY-NC-ND 4.0 International License

Dalla Lana School of Public Health
University of Toronto
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